Microsoft EVP Kathleen Hogan’s Book Recommendations in 2016

Hogan_bioAs the executive vice president of Human Resources at Microsoft, Kathleen Hogan is responsible for pushing the company’s cultural transformation forward so it can thrive in a mobile-first, cloud-first world.

Prior to this role, Hogan was corporate vice president of Microsoft Services, a team dedicated to helping businesses and consumers maximize the value of their investment in Microsoft technologies. Hogan has also served as corporate vice president of Customer Service and Support, responsible for the strategy and delivery of consumer and commercial technical support and customer service for Microsoft products and services.

Hogan recommends these three books in 2016.   Get recommended reads from other Microsoft Executives in 2016. 

To Kill a Mockingbird    Good to Great    The Tao of Coaching    Man's Search For Meaning

To Kill a Mockingbird
The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…And Others Don’t
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the very beginning.

The Tao of Coaching: Boost Your Effectiveness at Work by Inspiring and Developing Those Around You (Profile Business Classics)
The essence and success of The Tao of Coaching has always been its focus on the practical tips and techniques for making work more rewarding through the habit of coaching – and this philosophy continues to underpin this brand new reissue.

Man’s Search for Meaning
Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl’s theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos (“meaning”)-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.


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